Dubrovnik, Croatia

If it’s good enough for King Joffrey, it’s good enough for you
About a 15-minute drive from the Old City, there is a restaurant, carved into the side of the cliff, nestled on the eastern flank of a quiet Adriatic bay, where a smiling Croatian man might park his boat a stone’s throw from your table. He will carry in a grip of langoustines, mussels, or a cuttlefish, and your waiter will happily tell you that that’s what’s on today’s menu at Gverovic Osan . That waiter will then point to the lounge chairs situated on the nearby shore, offer you a bottle of local white wine, and tell you to swim and sunbathe for the next hour while the chef cooks your meal. It’s there, floating in the Dalmatian coast’s greenish-blue waters, that any worry of Dubrovnik being overrun by tourists will fade from your mind.6849713-croatia-pictureseuropemediterraneancroatiacroatiades_001505dubrovnikres_000465

The city’s ideal balance between old-world charm and modern European flare has contributed to a surge in popularity (and Game of Thrones, which is filmed on the city’s iconic, well-preserved medieval City Walls, surely helped), but gems like Gvervic Orsan are still waiting to be discovered. After you’ve exhausted the rich history of Dubrovnik, get on a ferry and visit Hvar or Mljet in the nearby archipelago.

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The Lost World and Angel Falls

 

Conan Doyle’s classic adventure novel was inspired by Venezuela’s “Lost World”, a region of dense jungle and rolling grassland dominated by immense sandstone table mountains known as tepuis. You’ll trek to the summit of Mount Roraima, a maze of blackened rock and babbling streams with unique plants and rare carnivorous frogs. Visit Auyán-tepui and see Angel Falls, the world’s highest waterfall, as it plunges 3,200ft., 15 days; £2,799pp, including flights.angel-falls-large.jpg